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cdowney
20-07-2008, 07:03 AM
hi just got a job offer doing process pipe drafting but i have no idea what it is and im havin a hard timw finding any info on the net can any1 plz help?


is there any books that wud be useful?

NukeCad
20-07-2008, 11:43 AM
Process pipework -

Compressed air supply lines, steam lines, water lines (hot, cold, or chilled), any process gas (argon, nitrogen, oxygen, etc), acids, alkalis, and so on.

Generally pipeline to carry any gas or fluid needed as part of a manufacturing process and the pumps, vessels, valves, etc needed to control the supply.

This is a specialist field; subject to strict laws in most countries, it is often dangerous if it is not done correctly.

If you have not had training and experience in the field you are best leaving it to those who have.

NukeCad
20-07-2008, 01:56 PM
Sorry I had to rush off before I had finished. So to continue -

Of course, everybody has to start somewhere to gain experience; so as long as the position is for detailing up the pipework runs between equipment that has already been selected for duties calculated by a pipeline designer then go for it and good luck with the job.

:thumbsup:

architech
20-07-2008, 07:22 PM
hi just got a job offer doing process pipe drafting but i have no idea what it is and im havin a hard timw finding any info on the net can any1 plz help?


is there any books that wud be useful?

I used to work for a company that had this department....

Every department (arch, elec, chem eng, struct, civil, etc) but this one required a degree ....

Process piping was and is a specialized engineering field..
a blue collar field...

These pipers as they were referred to... are special bunch...
Theses guys... at least in my experience get paid HIGH salaries...
as ALL pipers are Required to do 3D! for isometrics of piping layouts...
and knowing where valves needed to be placed....
and other periphals of piping....

But these guy .... come and go...
When a company hires these types of guys...
its understood... it a high paying client... that requested this specialty from an engineering company...

As i was told by many of these fellas....
typically a piper will last 3 to 4 years at company before moving on to the next engineering company and next big client project...

Like truck drivers/ nomads these guys moving around alot...

At least this is what i knew from for companies like

CH2MHIll
and
Foster Wheeler

cdowney
30-07-2008, 12:53 AM
cheers u have givin me food for thought.
im enrolled for a mech eng college course so on the right road why did it take me so long lol

its nice to knoe there are ppl willin to help.
if anyone knows of a ppd i wud luv to pick his/her brain lol

tinsmith
03-08-2008, 02:01 PM
I'm a piper, you're a piper, he's a piper, she's a piper, wouldn't you like to be a piper too?